horsehead and flame nebulae


home
history
equipment
visual observing sessions
imaging sessions
image post-processing
"The Imperative of Night" narrative
contact us

Welcome to taosastronomer.com!

offering local "hands-on" observing
(visual and imaging) sessions and instruction
viewing and imaging from Rabbit Valley Observatory
a dark sky location on the mesa just west of Taos, NM

 

Introduction and Concept -- click to read
 
comet lovejoy horsehead and flame nebulae taosastronomer.com history
comet lovejoy, horsehead and flame nebulae taosastronomer.com equipment used
comet lovejoy, horsehead and flame nebulae taosastronomer.com visual observing sessions
comet lovejoy, horsehead and flame nebulae taosastronomer.com imaging sessions
comet lovejoy, horsehead and flame nebulae taosastronomer.com image post-processing
comet lovejoy, horsehead and flame nebulae taosastronomer.com "The Imperative of Night" narrative

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT MOON

 

Hello and welcome to taosastronomer.com

This website is a celebration of the clear, dark skies of northern New Mexico and particularly the Taos area. We are blessed to bear witness to such a positive natural wonder -- but we need to also appreciate and frankly defend the unfortunate worldwide destruction and resultant rarity of such dark skies we are blessed with. It is our right. It is "The Imperative of Night."

Further, taosastronomer.com invites all of you to personally participate. Toward that end, taosastronomer.com offers group and personalized visual observing and imaging sessions from an amazing dark-sky location on the mesa just west of Taos, New Mexico. These sessions from the Rabbit Valley Observatory are scheduled to begin in the autumn of 2015, perhaps late September or early October. Rates are yet to be determined, but once they are, this information will be available here in the contact us section of the website. A map to the observatory is also available on the contact us page.

All equipment and instruction (including advanced computer post-processing of images the "day after") will be provided by experienced amateur astronomer Lewis W. (Willis) Greiner, Jr., who's been looking to the heavens with proper awe and respect since childhood. An incomplete summary of his astronomical and photographic history (including past viewing sessions here in the Taos area) is "presented" here as well, “for your approval."

If you have an interest in participating, please do not hesitate to contact us via the link provided. On the contact us page, we plan to include additional instructional links to helpful astronomy and astro-imaging sites and tutorials; to your left on this page we have included charts to review local seeing conditions and phases of the moon -- significant depending on your visual observing or imaging expectations and goals.

We'd like to think that we'll be able to accommodate your observing needs, whether beginning visual to relatively advanced imaging. We're sure we can learn from you as well!

We promise you that your experience here under Taos skies will enrich your life and help fulfill your soul!


navigation note -- links are not underlined -- and appear light brown -- once visited, they appear dark brown -- many images are hyper-linked, but do not display an obvious colored border -- if the ubiquitous "link-finger" appears, it's a link -- navigation appears top, bottom and in some cases rollover links appear left of the text

Rabbit Valley Observatory
Rabbit Valley Observatory
Rabbit Valley Observatory -- early 2015
RVO's telescopes and mount
Orion Nebula -- M42
First finished image obtained through RVO's Megrez 80mm refractor with Orion field-flattener, using a Baader-modified Canon XSi DSLR and BackyardEOS image-acquisition software -- 10 stacked images (5 light and 5 dark) of 60 seconds each, ISO 1600, driven by the Losmandy mount but unguided, processed with DeepSkyStacker and Photoshop. [copyright Rabbit Valley Observatory/Willis Greiner, 2015 -- all rights reserved]
Comet Lovejoy
Second finished image obtained through RVO's Megrez 80mm refractor with Orion field-flattener, using a Baader-modified Canon XSi DSLR and BackyardEOS image-acquisition software -- 10 stacked images (5 light and 5 dark) of 240 seconds each, ISO 1600, driven by the Losmandy mount but unguided, processed with DeepSkyStacker and Photoshop. [copyright Rabbit Valley Observatory/Willis Greiner, 2015 -- all rights reserved]

 

grayscale

To correctly and accurately view images such as those seen on this website, it is important to adjust your computer or device's monitor to the neutral gray scale above. First of all, every sector seen above should appear to be shades of a neutral gray -- gradually moving from black to white -- further, each segment should be independently visible, not "oozing into" one another. When your device is correctly calibrated (not so difficult) you will be able to view the images as they were created and intended to be seen.

Special note: I have recently become aware of "amateur" astronomer extraordinaire Rod Mollise of "Possum Swamp, United States." (Hey, I'm an Alabamian too!) I would recommend a review of his highly entertaining and perhaps more highly informative "Uncle Rod's Astro Blog," linked here. Check back often. I do. And I'll link to his site often here when commenting on just about anything, as he's informative, absolutely readable, and "he's one of us!"


home
history
equipment
visual observing sessions
imaging sessions
image post-processing
"The Imperative of Night" narrative
contact us

 

(all content copyright 2015 Willis Greiner Photography, all rights reserved)